Saint John of God


Church of St Bartholomew on the Tiber Island in Rome

March 8: Saint John of God, Religious—Optional Memorial

1495–1550
Patron Saint of hospitals, nurses, firefighters, booksellers, alcoholics, and the sick
Canonized October 16, 1690 by Pope Alexander VIII
Liturgical Color: White (Purple if Lenten Weekday)
Version: FullShort

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Quote:
Lord be blessed for in your great kindness to me who am such a great sinner having done so many wicked things, yet you see fit to set me free from such a tremendous temptation and deception which I fell into through my own sinfulness. You have brought me into a safe harbor where I shall endeavor to serve you with all my strength. My Lord, I beg you with all my might, give me the strength of your grace and always let me see your clemency. I want to be your slave, so kindly show me what I should do. Give peace and quiet to my soul which greatly desires this. O most worthy Lord, may this creature of yours serve and praise you. May I give my whole heart and mind to you. ~Prayed by Saint John of God at the time of his final conversion

Reflection: Saint John of God was born in the village of Montemor-o-Novo, Portugal to middle-class, faith-filled parents. According to his early biographer, John was abducted from his home when he was only eight years old and taken to the town of Oropesa, Spain, more than 200 miles away. In Oropesa, John found himself homeless and alone. He met a good man named El Mayoral who gave him a job as a shepherd and a place to live. John worked hard until he was twenty-two years old, never returning to his parents’ home. El Mayoral wanted John to marry his daughter, but John wanted to see the world. He joined the army of the Holy Roman Emperor and battled the French. During his service, he was assigned to guard some captured clothing that went missing. John was accused of theft and condemned to death, but others intervened and he was released. Frustrated with military life, John returned to El Mayoral’s farm where he worked for another four years before entering the army once again to fight the Turks for the next eighteen years.

Upon the completion of his military service, John decided to return to his home country in Montemor-o-Novo to learn what became of his parents. After much searching, he found one of his elderly uncles who informed him that his mother died of heartbreak after his abduction and that his father joined the Franciscans and advanced in holiness. John said to his uncle, “I no longer wish to stay in this country; but rather to go in search of a way to serve Our Lord beyond my native place, just as my father did. He gave me a good example by doing that. I have been so wicked and sinful and since the Lord has given me life, it is fitting that I should use it to serve him and do penance.”

John began an interior search for the best way he could serve God and decided to journey to Africa, to ransom himself to the Muslims in exchange for their prisoners. On the journey, he met a knight and his family who were destitute and unable to care for themselves. The knight begged for John’s help that John gladly gave by working and giving them his earnings. When one of John’s fellow workers fled to Muslim territory and converted to Islam, John began to despair, thinking he should have done more for his friend. After seeking counsel from a Franciscan monastery, he decided to return to the mainland of Spain for the good of his soul.

Upon his arrival, John threw himself into a life of prayer, made a general confession, and tearfully went from church to church begging God for the forgiveness of his sins. To support himself, he began to buy and sell religious pictures and books as a traveling salesman. He found this to be spiritually rewarding and fruitful for the salvation of souls. Eventually, at the age of forty-six, he set up a small shop of religious items at Granada’s city gate.

Soon after, the great preacher Saint John of Ávila came to town to preach a mission. John was in attendance and was so moved by John of Ávila’s sermons, and so keenly aware of his own sins, that he started running through the streets like a madman, shouting for mercy. He returned to his shop and destroyed every book that was not religious, gave every other religious book and picture away to those passing by, gave away the rest of his possessions, and continued crying out in the streets that he was a sinner. “Mercy! Mercy, Lord God, on this tremendous sinner who has so offended you!” Many thought John was a lunatic. Some good men brought him to Saint John of Ávila who heard his confession, counseled him, consoled him, and offered his continued guidance. But John was so deeply touched by the priest’s holy help that he wanted everyone in the town to know how sinful he was, so he ran through the streets crying out again and rolled in mud as a sign of his sinfulness. Eventually, two compassionate men took John to the local insane asylum for treatment.

The theory of the day was that those who were insane were best cured by locking them in a dungeon and torturing them continuously until they chose to abandon their insanity, and this is what happened to John. Saint John of Ávila heard of this and began communicating with John, encouraging him, and guiding him. He received every beating in the asylum with joy as penance and offered each sacrificially to God. Throughout, John exhorted the warden and other officers to treat the patients better. When John began to exude a peaceful disposition, the warden was pleased and permitted him to be freed of his shackles. John showed mercy and compassion to others, performing menial charitable tasks and spreading God’s love. He thought to himself, “May Jesus Christ eventually give me the grace to run a hospice where the abandoned poor and those suffering from mental disorders might have refuge and that I may be able to serve them as I wish.”

After receiving permission to leave the asylum, John made a pilgrimage and had a vision of the Blessed Mother who encouraged him to work for the poor and infirm. Upon his return to Granada, he moved forward with his desire to open a hospital. Through begging, he was able to rent a building, furnish it, and begin seeking out the sick. He worked tirelessly to care for them, begged for food, brought priests to hear their confessions, and nursed them back to health. In the years following, John extended his mission of mercy to the poor, the abandoned, widows, orphans, the unemployed, prostitutes, and all who suffered. Soon, others were so inspired by the work John was doing that they joined him. His companions in the work made up what would eventually become the Order of Hospitallers. In John’s life, the group would be only an organized group of companions, but twenty-two years after John’s death, the pope would approve this group of men as a new religious order. Among the many miracles that have been reported, the most notable was when John ran in and out of a burning hospital to rescue patients without being burned himself. 

Saint John of God is a shining example of God’s power. He was a sinner and was thought to be mentally ill, but God did incredible things through him. If you ever feel as though you have nothing to offer God, think of Saint John and know that the weaker you may feel, the more God can use you.

Prayer: Saint John of God, you struggled in many ways throughout your life. Through it all, you never gave up your desire to serve God and others. Please pray for me, especially when I lose hope, that I may imitate your example and offer myself to God for His glory and the service of all. Saint John of God, pray for me. Jesus, I trust in You.

Reflection taken from:

Saints and Feasts of the Liturgical Year
Volumes One–Four


Further Reading:

Catholic Saints & Feasts

Sanctoral

First Biography of Saint John of God

Catholic Encyclopedia

Butler’s Lives of the Saints

Catholic Culture

Catholic Exchange

Catholic Fire

Franciscan Media

Wikipedia

All Saints for Today

All Saints for the Liturgical Year


(Short Version)

March 8: Saint John of God, Religious—Optional Memorial

1495–1550
Patron Saint of hospitals, nurses, firefighters, booksellers, alcoholics, and the sick
Canonized October 16, 1690 by Pope Alexander VIII

Born in Montemor-o-Novo, Portugal, John was abducted from his home at the age of eight and taken to Oropesa, Spain. Homeless and alone, John met a good man named El Mayoral who took him in and gave him a job as a shepherd. John worked for El Mayoral for fourteen years and then joined the Holy Roman Emperor’s army to battle the French. Accused of the theft of clothing he had been assigned to guard, John was condemned to death. After friends intervened and won his release, John returned to El Mayoral’s farm and worked for another four years before re-entering the army to fight the Turks for the next eighteen years.

Returning to Portugal, John learned that his mother died of heartbreak after his abduction and that his father joined the Franciscans. Inspired by his father, John desired to serve God. He set out for Africa to offer himself to the Muslims in exchange for their prisoners but returned to Spain.

There, John threw himself into a life of prayer, made a general confession, and tearfully went from church to church begging God to forgive his sins. To support himself, he bought and sold religious pictures and books, eventually setting up a small shop of religious items at Granada’s city gate.

When Saint John of Ávila preached a mission in Granada, John was so moved by his sermons and so keenly aware of his own sins, that he started running through the streets, shouting for mercy. In his shop, he destroyed every non-religious book, gave the religious books and pictures away to those passing by, and continued crying out in the streets that he was a sinner. Some concerned men brought him to Saint John of Ávila who heard his confession, counseled him, consoled him, and offered his continued guidance. John was so touched that he wanted everyone in the town to know how sinful he was. He ran through the streets crying out again, rolling in mud as a sign of his sinfulness. Eventually, two men took John to the local insane asylum for treatment.

At the time, the insane were locked in a dungeon and tortured until they abandoned their insanity. With the help of Saint John of Ávila’s encouragement and guidance, John received every beating with joy as penance and offered each to God. He exhorted the prison workers to treat the patients better. When John began to exude a peaceful disposition, the warden permitted him to be freed of his shackles. John performed menial tasks with mercy and compassion and spread God’s love. He desired to run a hospice for the abandoned poor and those suffering from mental disorders.

After his release from the asylum, John made a pilgrimage and had a vision of the Blessed Mother who encouraged him to work for the poor and infirm. Returning to Granada, he moved forward to open a hospital. Through begging, he was able to rent a building, furnish it, and begin seeking out the sick. He worked tirelessly to care for them, begged for food, brought priests to hear their confessions, and nursed them back to health. Later, John extended his mission of mercy to the poor, the abandoned, widows, orphans, the unemployed, prostitutes, and all who suffered. Soon, others joined John’s work, eventually becoming the Order of Hospitallers. Twenty-two years after John’s death, the pope would approve this group of men as a new religious order. 

Saint John of God, through all the struggles of your life, you never gave up your desire to serve God and others. Please pray for me, especially when I lose hope, that I may imitate your example and offer myself to God for His glory and the service of all. Saint John of God, pray for me. Jesus, I trust in You.

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